Testosterone “Low T” and Other Hormone Treatments

A 2014 study says Testosterone prescription drugs are linked to increased risk of heart attack, stroke, pulmonary embolism, blood clots and other potentially fatal conditions. The risk of heart attack increases two to three times for some men.

A study published by the Public Library of Science One (PLoS One) found an association between testosterone therapy (TT) and cardiovascular disease.  The risk for heart attack in men under the age of 65 who had a history of heart disease was increased; for older men the increased risk was a factor even without a history of heart disease. Within the first 90 days of starting TT, the risk doubled for men over 65 . For men under 65 with a history of heart disease, the risk almost tripled. An additional study also found the increased risk of both non fatal and fatal heart attacks. See news video below.

Lawsuits Against the Drug Companies Are Filed, the FDA Says It Will Revisit the Safety of Testosterone Drugs

Two days after the PLoS study was released, the FDA announced they will review the safety of testosterone therapy, saying they are “investigating the risk of stroke, heart attack and death in men taking FDA-approved testosterone products.” On January 31 2014, the FDA issued a safety alert that indicates the agency is investigating testosterone therapy confirming their action, after reports of death, stroke, pulmonary embolism and blood clots.

The Harman Law Firm is representing men who have experienced heart attacks or strokes after taking testosterone therapy as well as men who develop prostate cancer after long-term TT. Call our dangerous drug attorneys at (888) 554-2762 to learn more, learn what options you may have, and if you are eligible for compensation.

Sales and Marketing of Testosterone Therapy Drugs for “Low T”: Mounting Opposition From Researchers and Experts

Sales of the following testosterone therapy “androgen” class of drugs have skyrocketed in recent years:

  • Axiron
  • AndroDerm
  • AndroGel (the biggest seller and creator of the marketing term “Low T”)
  • Delatestryl
  • Fortesta
  • Striant
  • Testim
  • Testopel

Over $107 million was spent by drug makers in 2013 to advertise TT. The “marketing juggernaut,” says  “Selling That New Man Feeling” in the New York Times:
” . . . is running into mounting opposition from some prominent medical researchers and industry experts. They contend that the pharmaceutical industry has vastly expanded the market for testosterone drugs to many men who may not need them and may be exposed to increased health risks by taking them. And drug makers have done so, these critics say, by exploiting loopholes in federal marketing regulations.”

Ads on TV and radio, in newspapers and magazines and other outlets cite the results of a study that said “four out of every ten men over the age of 45 are affected by low testosterone.”  In the ads, men are encouraged to ask their doctors if they have “Low T,” fill out an online questionnaire on one of the drug manufacturer’s website, and take a list of “Eight Questions Older Men Should Ask Their Health Care Providers.”

The attorneys here at the Harman Law Firm will continue to investigate the health risks and legal remedies for men affected by TT drugs. Watch our blog for updates. You may also contact us to be notified when there is “Low T” related news posted on our site.

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